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Readings 6

June 8, 2011

Prof. Rosenblatt’s “Measuring the Impact of Your Social Media Program” mainly talks about how to measure the potential social media reach for advocacy. He first explains “reach” is about the audience size and how many people can actually see the message. So the simplest metric number is how many people see the advocacy message. But not many people will click the links contained within the message, so the posts should contain the key message points. Though it’s hard to get the exact number that how many people saw the ads, Rosenblatt thinks it’s very important to understand the exposure of the running ads to the audience. The most direct measurement is the number of friends, fans or followers on Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. And you can use varies tools for detailed analysis of these supporters.

This article also talks about how to increase the potential audience. Specifically, frequent use of popular hashtag on Twitter can largely increase the audience size.

Another good measurement of reach is the number of Twitter impressions when you’re promoting a link. With the help of BackType.com, you will know how many times this link actually appears on someone’s screen, which betters understanding the real impact.

Lastly, the article talks about how to analyze the Twitter follower via sites like Tweetake.comTweetbackup.com and MyTweeple.com.

Rosenblatt’s another article “Rules of Social Media Engagement” discusses two other aspects of social media’s influence: engagement and driving web traffic home.

First, engagement’s measurement includes sharing your message and recommending you or your message on Twitter and Facebook.

Second, measurement of driving web traffic home is how many people click through to your Web site from Facebook and Twitter. With the help of link shorten tools, you can collect reasonably close data and use them for comparison. In addition, Rosenblatt recommends two sites Klout.com and Twitalyzer.com to measure your message’s influence on Twitter.

The article concludes that though all these tools are very useful to measure how well you’re doing on Twitter, a combined tool to stream all these metrics is very much in need.

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